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Rad Tech Week- Nov 6-12- Specialized Training and Licensing Characterize Rad Techs' Profession

By Bobbi Guzman, RT(R)(MR), President Oregon Society of Radiologic Technologists

As President of the Oregon Society of Radiologic Technologists (OSRT) I am proud to announce National Radiologic Technology Week(R), Nov. 6-12. This special week was created by the American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) in 1979 to be celebrated each year encompassing Nov. 8, the day that German physicist Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen discovered the X-ray in 1895.

Radiologic Technologists (RTs) are the medical personnel who perform diagnostic imaging examinations and administer radiation therapy treatments. We work with some of the most innovative equipment in the medical field to help identify pathologies, plan and administer treatment and restore patient health. RTs specialize in mammography, computed tomography (CT or CAT scan), cardiac-interventional procedures, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine, ultrasound, radiation therapy and general diagnostic radiology (X-ray). Each acquires images of the body in a different manner -- some use radiation, some use sonar waves, others use magnetism and radiofrequency pulses. The equipment used by technologists is phenomenal! I am in awe of the complexities of these machines, the science behind the technology and the professionals who dedicate their time and effort to providing for societal health.

Most RTs attend a two or four-year program, ending up with either an associate's or a bachelor's degree. After graduation, there is a national board exam administered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) for licensing and credentials. In Oregon, all RTs must also be licensed through the Oregon Board of Medical Imaging (OBMI). The requirements to work as an RT vary widely among states. As a matter of fact, there have been multiple attempts made to adopt legislation that would set a national minimum standard of education for technologists across the country. I was in Washington DC in the spring of 2014 meeting with legislators and trying to help gain support for the CARE bill (Consistency, Accuracy, Responsibility and Excellence in Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy). Currently we are still working to get these basic requirements adopted into law. If you'd like to know more, please visit: http://cqrcengage.com/asrt/CARE.

Fortune has smiled on me when it comes to my profession. Not only have I found an ideal career as a Radiologic Technologist (RT), but I am blessed beyond measure to know so many other dedicated, caring and educated technologists who are just as passionate as I am. Providing patients with safe medical imaging examinations and radiation therapy treatments is the prime goal for RTs. To recognize the vital work of Radiologic Technologists across the state, the Oregon Society of Radiologic Technologists is celebrating Nov. 6-12, 2016.

About OSRT and ASRT: Bobbi Guzman, RT(R)(MR) is President of the OSRT, a statewide association with a mission to develop a dynamic membership promoting and facilitating world-class radiologic patient care through enhanced market awareness and effective legislation. She resides in Albany and works for Mission Medical Imaging in Salem, Oregon. www.OregonSRT.org.


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