Mission Statement

Develop a dynamic membership promoting and facilitating world-class radiologic patient care through enhanced market awareness and effective legislation

Technologist in the Spotlight: Jason Kandle

02 Mar 2018 2:51 PM | Sidney Gallardo (Administrator)

Jason Kandle is the technologist in the spotlight this month.  He received his radiologic technologist license in 2012, became a CT technologist in 2013 and an MRI technologist in 2014.  Jason now works for CORA, Central Oregon Radiology Association, in Bend, Oregon.  

Jason had previously worked as a mill supervisor for 18 years in Redmond, Oregon.  In 2007 he lost his job due to massive layoffs, however this didn’t slow Jason down.  The day after he was laid off he was applying at Central Oregon Community College. Through the Trade Act Jason was able to receive funds to train in a new profession.  After taking a career test, diagnostic imaging was at the top of his list.  Unfortunately, his career advisor told Jason that the program was too hard to get into and that he should choose something else.  That discouragement only served to spur him on to prove the advisor wrong.  Jason got straight A’s in all of his classes and was one of only two students accepted into the Linn Benton Community College Diagnostic Imaging program.  In the program he became friends with Jake Piercy and the two competitively inspired each other to succeed.  Jason spent his clinical rotations in Central Oregon in Prineville, Bend Medical Center, Redmond Hospital, CORA and St. Charles.  After he got his license he had an opportunity to get a CT position in Madras and then had an opportunity to train in MRI at CORA, where he worked CT for 3 days a week and MRI for 4 days.

Jason and his fiance have 7 children between the two of them, with only one at home.  He loves action packed movies and camping with his family.

Jason is motivated by helping others.  With two brothers in the military, in his second career Jason was looking for something that was more rewarding than millwork.  He wanted to make a difference in people’s lives, to help people.  As he works with patients Jason knows he is making a positive impact on people.  He knows that his tenacity, hard work and determination is a great example for his family.

Some of the benefits that Jason loves about being a tech is the opportunity to meet new people each day and how each exam is a new adventure.  This unpredictability is also an obstacle in our profession but he looks at these problems as exciting challenges.  What Jason really loves about being a tech is making a difference in the lives that he touches.

One thing Jason would love to change about our profession is all the politics and corporatization of healthcare.  He says they used to have 1 hour and 45 minutes to scan a patient in MRI, now they only get 30 minutes which really affects patient care.  But he doesn't let negativity get him down, he has a desire to keep learning and a passion to share his expertise with others.  Jason loves to share about his profession with high school and college students and he has seen a whole new world open up for them when they learn about diagnostic imaging.

His advice to students is, you get out of the program what you put into it.  You don’t have to be the smartest person as long as you have good patient care, and don’t let anyone tell you it’s impossible!  He says that he owes a lot to the LBCC program and his clinical mentors and he recommends that you find friends along that way who will support you.

Jason advises other techs to be open minded about learning new things. He says, be willing to share what you know and be willing to learn from others.  There are excellent techs in the field who know lots of great tips and tricks.

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